Velvet.
Velvet.
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Tennessee Williams & Marlon Brando (1948)
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theniftyfifties:

Flamenco dancer, 1956 
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didierleclair:

BEN, BOLD AND BLUESY…
Ben Webster, jazz sax master
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ladiesofthe60s:

Warhol superstar Susan Bottomly photographed by Billy Name.
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inneroptics:

Allen Frame and Nan Goldin, Photo Booth picture c. 1978
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a-bittersweet-life:

Shadow is mystery and light is clarity. Shadow conceals, light reveals. To know what to reveal and what to conceal, and in what degrees to do this, is all there is to art.
Josef von Sternberg
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elisebrown:

Debbie Harry: A ’70s icon revealed
1. Debbie Harry, the lead singer of Blondie, is seen in this photo taken in the late ’70s by her bandmate and former lover, Chris Stein.
2. Harry and David Bowie backstage during a tour in 1977.
3. Harry reads the British tabloid The Sun. Harry and Stein broke up years ago, but they’re still friends and still touring with Blondie.
4. Harry in a vintage motorcycle jacket, circa 1976. In the new book, Harry says Stein’s photos of her are “the most real and unguarded and ultimately revealing.”
5. Harry sits in a car in Los Angeles for a “Plastic Letters” outtake, circa 1977.
She gazes at the camera with feral, wide-set eyes, framed by pouty lips and bleached blond hair — a face that helped sell 40 million records.
As a rock star and global icon, Debbie Harry has been photographed thousands of times. But never quite like this: in spare, intimate portraits, many of them taken in dingy apartments and clubs before she was famous.
“It was casual. There wasn’t much setup or manipulation (of the photos),” said Chris Stein, her Blondie bandmate and former lover who took the photos. “We were together all the time anyway.”
Read more on CNN
elisebrown:

Debbie Harry: A ’70s icon revealed
1. Debbie Harry, the lead singer of Blondie, is seen in this photo taken in the late ’70s by her bandmate and former lover, Chris Stein.
2. Harry and David Bowie backstage during a tour in 1977.
3. Harry reads the British tabloid The Sun. Harry and Stein broke up years ago, but they’re still friends and still touring with Blondie.
4. Harry in a vintage motorcycle jacket, circa 1976. In the new book, Harry says Stein’s photos of her are “the most real and unguarded and ultimately revealing.”
5. Harry sits in a car in Los Angeles for a “Plastic Letters” outtake, circa 1977.
She gazes at the camera with feral, wide-set eyes, framed by pouty lips and bleached blond hair — a face that helped sell 40 million records.
As a rock star and global icon, Debbie Harry has been photographed thousands of times. But never quite like this: in spare, intimate portraits, many of them taken in dingy apartments and clubs before she was famous.
“It was casual. There wasn’t much setup or manipulation (of the photos),” said Chris Stein, her Blondie bandmate and former lover who took the photos. “We were together all the time anyway.”
Read more on CNN
elisebrown:

Debbie Harry: A ’70s icon revealed
1. Debbie Harry, the lead singer of Blondie, is seen in this photo taken in the late ’70s by her bandmate and former lover, Chris Stein.
2. Harry and David Bowie backstage during a tour in 1977.
3. Harry reads the British tabloid The Sun. Harry and Stein broke up years ago, but they’re still friends and still touring with Blondie.
4. Harry in a vintage motorcycle jacket, circa 1976. In the new book, Harry says Stein’s photos of her are “the most real and unguarded and ultimately revealing.”
5. Harry sits in a car in Los Angeles for a “Plastic Letters” outtake, circa 1977.
She gazes at the camera with feral, wide-set eyes, framed by pouty lips and bleached blond hair — a face that helped sell 40 million records.
As a rock star and global icon, Debbie Harry has been photographed thousands of times. But never quite like this: in spare, intimate portraits, many of them taken in dingy apartments and clubs before she was famous.
“It was casual. There wasn’t much setup or manipulation (of the photos),” said Chris Stein, her Blondie bandmate and former lover who took the photos. “We were together all the time anyway.”
Read more on CNN
elisebrown:

Debbie Harry: A ’70s icon revealed
1. Debbie Harry, the lead singer of Blondie, is seen in this photo taken in the late ’70s by her bandmate and former lover, Chris Stein.
2. Harry and David Bowie backstage during a tour in 1977.
3. Harry reads the British tabloid The Sun. Harry and Stein broke up years ago, but they’re still friends and still touring with Blondie.
4. Harry in a vintage motorcycle jacket, circa 1976. In the new book, Harry says Stein’s photos of her are “the most real and unguarded and ultimately revealing.”
5. Harry sits in a car in Los Angeles for a “Plastic Letters” outtake, circa 1977.
She gazes at the camera with feral, wide-set eyes, framed by pouty lips and bleached blond hair — a face that helped sell 40 million records.
As a rock star and global icon, Debbie Harry has been photographed thousands of times. But never quite like this: in spare, intimate portraits, many of them taken in dingy apartments and clubs before she was famous.
“It was casual. There wasn’t much setup or manipulation (of the photos),” said Chris Stein, her Blondie bandmate and former lover who took the photos. “We were together all the time anyway.”
Read more on CNN
elisebrown:

Debbie Harry: A ’70s icon revealed
1. Debbie Harry, the lead singer of Blondie, is seen in this photo taken in the late ’70s by her bandmate and former lover, Chris Stein.
2. Harry and David Bowie backstage during a tour in 1977.
3. Harry reads the British tabloid The Sun. Harry and Stein broke up years ago, but they’re still friends and still touring with Blondie.
4. Harry in a vintage motorcycle jacket, circa 1976. In the new book, Harry says Stein’s photos of her are “the most real and unguarded and ultimately revealing.”
5. Harry sits in a car in Los Angeles for a “Plastic Letters” outtake, circa 1977.
She gazes at the camera with feral, wide-set eyes, framed by pouty lips and bleached blond hair — a face that helped sell 40 million records.
As a rock star and global icon, Debbie Harry has been photographed thousands of times. But never quite like this: in spare, intimate portraits, many of them taken in dingy apartments and clubs before she was famous.
“It was casual. There wasn’t much setup or manipulation (of the photos),” said Chris Stein, her Blondie bandmate and former lover who took the photos. “We were together all the time anyway.”
Read more on CNN
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artistandstudio:

Picasso
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Ingrid Bergman photographed by John Engstead, 1940
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deforest:

Joan Crawford, 1937
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Gene Tierney, April 1947. Photo by John Tresilian
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Two women lighting each others’ cigarettes, Westeinde, The Netherlands, 1932.
Source: Nationaal Archief
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"Rita Hayworth once said the problem with her life was that the men in it fell in love with Gilda, her most glamourous role, and woke up the next morning with her. That’s a sentiment I can fully identify with. I’ve always felt a prisoner of my image, felt that people preferred the myths and didn’t want to hear about the real me at all. Because I was promoted as a sort of a siren and played all those sexy broads, people made the mistake of thinking I was like that off the screen. They couldn’t have been more wrong. Although no one believes it, I came to Hollywood almost pathologically shy, a country girl with a country girl’s ordinary values." 
-Ava Gardner
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violentwavesofemotion:

Coffee & Cigarettes (2003) dir. by Jim Jarmusch: "An odd concept for a film, Coffee and Cigarettes can be seen as either one of two ways. On one hand a dark, clever, ingenious piece of cinema, or on the other hand a dark, clever, ingenious piece of cinema. Jim Jarmusch can’t be beaten. The dialogue seems to be mostly improvised, but the concept is not. Every short chapter here has a meaning and gives us something to think about. The films are in black and white, like coffee and cigarettes and that still is, and will always be, a way of pushing things harder. This is very much comedy and very much serious." (x)
violentwavesofemotion:

Coffee & Cigarettes (2003) dir. by Jim Jarmusch: "An odd concept for a film, Coffee and Cigarettes can be seen as either one of two ways. On one hand a dark, clever, ingenious piece of cinema, or on the other hand a dark, clever, ingenious piece of cinema. Jim Jarmusch can’t be beaten. The dialogue seems to be mostly improvised, but the concept is not. Every short chapter here has a meaning and gives us something to think about. The films are in black and white, like coffee and cigarettes and that still is, and will always be, a way of pushing things harder. This is very much comedy and very much serious." (x)
violentwavesofemotion:

Coffee & Cigarettes (2003) dir. by Jim Jarmusch: "An odd concept for a film, Coffee and Cigarettes can be seen as either one of two ways. On one hand a dark, clever, ingenious piece of cinema, or on the other hand a dark, clever, ingenious piece of cinema. Jim Jarmusch can’t be beaten. The dialogue seems to be mostly improvised, but the concept is not. Every short chapter here has a meaning and gives us something to think about. The films are in black and white, like coffee and cigarettes and that still is, and will always be, a way of pushing things harder. This is very much comedy and very much serious." (x)
violentwavesofemotion:

Coffee & Cigarettes (2003) dir. by Jim Jarmusch: "An odd concept for a film, Coffee and Cigarettes can be seen as either one of two ways. On one hand a dark, clever, ingenious piece of cinema, or on the other hand a dark, clever, ingenious piece of cinema. Jim Jarmusch can’t be beaten. The dialogue seems to be mostly improvised, but the concept is not. Every short chapter here has a meaning and gives us something to think about. The films are in black and white, like coffee and cigarettes and that still is, and will always be, a way of pushing things harder. This is very much comedy and very much serious." (x)
violentwavesofemotion:

Coffee & Cigarettes (2003) dir. by Jim Jarmusch: "An odd concept for a film, Coffee and Cigarettes can be seen as either one of two ways. On one hand a dark, clever, ingenious piece of cinema, or on the other hand a dark, clever, ingenious piece of cinema. Jim Jarmusch can’t be beaten. The dialogue seems to be mostly improvised, but the concept is not. Every short chapter here has a meaning and gives us something to think about. The films are in black and white, like coffee and cigarettes and that still is, and will always be, a way of pushing things harder. This is very much comedy and very much serious." (x)
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mpdrolet:

Annelie Vandendael